Why the voltmeter needs to be connected in parallel with resistor?

A voltmeter needs to be connected in parallel with a resistor or across any component in a circuit to measure the voltage drop across that component accurately. When connected in parallel, the voltmeter forms a separate branch with the component of interest, allowing it to measure the potential difference (voltage) between the two points where it is connected. This setup ensures that the voltmeter measures the voltage directly across the resistor without altering the current flow through it, as the voltmeter’s internal resistance is very high compared to the circuit resistance.

The voltmeter is connected in parallel with the resistor to directly measure the voltage drop across it. This setup ensures that the voltmeter reads the potential difference between two points in the circuit without affecting the current flow through the resistor or altering the circuit’s overall behavior. By connecting in parallel, the voltmeter accurately reflects the voltage across the resistor, providing precise measurement data for analysis or troubleshooting purposes.

In electric circuits, a voltmeter is typically connected in parallel across the points of interest to measure the voltage difference between those points. This configuration ensures that the voltmeter reads the potential difference directly without disturbing the circuit’s operation. By connecting in parallel, the voltmeter’s high input impedance allows it to draw minimal current from the circuit, thereby avoiding significant voltage drops or changes that could affect measurement accuracy.

A resistor is connected in series with a voltmeter to limit the current flowing through the voltmeter when measuring high voltages. In high-voltage measurements, the resistor protects the voltmeter by dropping most of the voltage across itself, ensuring that only a safe voltage is applied to the voltmeter for measurement. This arrangement prevents damage to the voltmeter and allows it to accurately measure the voltage drop across the resistor or circuit component without risk of exceeding its voltage rating.

In contrast to a voltmeter, an ammeter is connected in series with a resistor or any component to measure the current flowing through it. By placing the ammeter in series, all the current flowing through the circuit also flows through the ammeter, allowing it to directly measure the current without altering the circuit’s operation. On the other hand, a voltmeter is connected in parallel across a resistor to measure the voltage drop across it without disrupting the current flow through the resistor. This parallel connection ensures that the voltmeter accurately measures the voltage difference across the resistor or component under test.

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