Home / What is Basic / What do you know about free energy ?

What do you know about free energy ?

The term “free energy” has been used in various contexts, and it’s crucial to clarify that in scientific and engineering terms, “free energy” is not synonymous with perpetual motion or unlimited energy without any cost or input. Instead, it is a concept used in thermodynamics and physics to describe the energy available to do work in a system.

1. Thermodynamic Definition:

  • In thermodynamics, free energy is often denoted by the symbol G (Gibbs free energy) or F (Helmholtz free energy). The Gibbs free energy is used for systems at constant pressure, while the Helmholtz free energy is used for systems at constant volume.

2. Gibbs Free Energy (G):

  • For a system at constant pressure, Gibbs free energy is defined as G = H – TS, where H is enthalpy, T is temperature, and S is entropy. The change in Gibbs free energy, ΔG, during a process determines whether the process is spontaneous. If ΔG is negative, the process occurs spontaneously.

3. Helmholtz Free Energy (F):

  • For a system at constant volume, Helmholtz free energy is defined as F = U – TS, where U is internal energy, T is temperature, and S is entropy. Similar to Gibbs free energy, the change in Helmholtz free energy, ΔF, indicates whether a process is spontaneous when negative.

4. Significance in Thermodynamics:

  • The concept of free energy is significant in predicting the spontaneity and direction of chemical and physical processes. In a closed system, a process tends to occur spontaneously if it leads to a decrease in free energy.

5. Perpetual Motion and Misconceptions:

  • It’s important to note that the term “free energy” is often misused in the context of perpetual motion or devices claiming to produce unlimited energy without input. Such claims violate the laws of thermodynamics, which dictate that energy cannot be created or destroyed, only converted from one form to another.

6. Renewable Energy and Sustainability:

  • In a broader societal context, discussions about “free energy” may relate to renewable energy sources, such as solar or wind power. While these sources harness energy from natural processes, they still require initial investments and ongoing maintenance. The term “free” in this context implies that the energy source is abundant and freely available from nature.

In summary, the concept of free energy in thermodynamics refers to the energy available to do work in a system. It plays a crucial role in understanding the spontaneity of physical and chemical processes. However, it’s essential to distinguish this scientific concept from misleading notions of perpetual motion or unlimited energy generation without proper understanding of the laws of thermodynamics.

Recent Updates