How does alternating flux produced in transformer ?

Flux in a transformer is generated through the principle of electromagnetic induction. When an alternating current (AC) flows through the primary winding of a transformer, it creates a varying magnetic field around the winding. According to Faraday’s Law of Electromagnetic Induction, this changing magnetic field induces a voltage in the secondary winding. This induced voltage generates an alternating flux in the transformer’s core. The alternating flux links both the primary and secondary windings, facilitating the transfer of electrical energy from the primary to the secondary circuit.

A transformer produces an alternating current (AC) in the secondary coil through mutual induction. As the alternating current flows through the primary winding, it induces a changing magnetic flux in the transformer’s core. This varying magnetic flux cuts through the turns of the secondary winding, generating an electromotive force (EMF) according to Faraday’s Law. This induced EMF causes an alternating current to flow in the secondary coil. Therefore, the primary alternating current is transformed into a corresponding alternating current in the secondary coil, scaled by the turns ratio of the transformer.

Flux in the context of alternating current (AC) refers to the changing magnetic field that links the windings of a transformer. As AC flows through the primary winding, it continuously alternates in direction, causing the magnetic flux in the transformer’s core to vary accordingly. This alternating flux is essential for inducing a voltage in the secondary winding, which ultimately results in the production of alternating current in the secondary circuit of the transformer.

In a transformer, the magnetic flux through the core changes continuously in response to the alternating current passing through the primary winding. This alternating flux is crucial for inducing a voltage in the secondary winding and transferring electrical energy from the primary to the secondary circuit. The rate of change of flux determines the magnitude of the induced voltage and subsequently the amount of alternating current that can be transferred between the windings.

Yes, flux changes continuously in a transformer due to the alternating current passing through its primary winding. As the AC current alternates direction, it causes the magnetic flux in the transformer’s core to vary accordingly. This alternating flux is fundamental to the operation of the transformer, as it induces voltages in the secondary winding and facilitates the transformation of electrical energy from one voltage level to another. Therefore, the flux in a transformer undergoes constant change in synchronization with the alternating current flowing through its windings.

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